STORYTELLING IN WORD AND IMAGE: “PRECIOUS STONES” FROM THE AFRICAN ORAL TRADITION
Open to Ages 16-29
Saturdays, June 1-July 13, 10-2, Johns Hopkins Medical Campus, Miller Research Building 182, 733 N. Broadway, 21205

In this storytelling workshop, student fellows will explore stories from the African oral tradition, using them as inspiration for their own original “storyboards,” visual outlines for short films.  Storyboarding is an essential part of preproduction for film and animation, and consists of a series of images that map out the main ideas and key compositions for a moving picture.  Storyboards are often hand-drawn; in this workshop they’ll be photographic, encouraging fellows to enter into their stories through the lens from the start.  The African oral arts are rich in history and myth and offer insight into universal human experience.  Fellows will collectively analyze a range of stories, discovering and connecting with their principles, finding reflections of their own lives and interests.  They’ll create individual narratives grounded in the African tales, and design three-shot storyboards for exhibition and for possible future development into short films.  Each fellow will also write an artist’s statement highlighting the qualities and principles expressed through the work, and including a brief story synopsis.  Storyboards and statements will be shared on the program website and at a public exhibition. Limited to 12 student fellows

David Fakunle, Ph.D. is Co-Founder and CEO of DiscoverME/RecoverME: Enrichment Through the African Oral Tradition. A Baltimore native, David is currently a research fellow at Morgan State University. His career as an African storyteller, African drummer, and researcher operates at the intersection of arts and public health.   

Olugbenga Osikomaiya, a Morgan State University graduate, is a freelance cinematographer and photographer who focuses on creating compelling images that also tell a story.